Company

Charles St. Clair

Charles St. Clair

Charles is an interdisciplinary artist with over 400 major productions to his credit in theatre, lm and video. Some directing credits include: By the Way, Meet Vera Stark, Race, Indivisible, August in April, TopDog/UnderDog, Death and the Maiden, The 36th, Underneath the Lintel, Venus, Bee-Luther-Hatchee, The Piano Lesson, A Raisin in the Sun, Mozart’s Opera The Marriage of Figaro, The Impresario, as well as The Three Penny Opera, Faust, Tosca, La Traviata, Carmen and the ve- time ariZoni award winning production of Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill. Mr. St. Clair was Resident Equity Stage Manager for Burt Reynolds’ Theatre in Jupiter, FL, the Ruth Foreman Theatre in Miami, FL and the North Carolina Shakespeare Festival. He has been a technical director and production manager for over 300 productions and events, including the Closing Ceremonies of the Winter Special Olympics, the Orange and Sun Bowl half time productions and tours to Europe, China, India and the Middle East. He has also had the opportunity of lighting such well-known performers as Liza Minnelli, Barbara Mandrell, Pia Zadora, Alabama, Harry Belafonte and tours of the Broadway shows A Chorus Line, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, Into My Parlor, I’m Not Rapport and Arsenic and Old Lace. Mr. St. Clair presently serves on the faculty of Arizona State University at the West campus where he teaches Acting and Directing and serves as the Technical Director for the Division of Humanities, Arts and Cultural Studies in the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences.

Credits

Production Team

Veronica's Room

From the author of Rosemary’s Baby comes an harrowing labyrinth of suspense, entwining fantasy and reality. The story begins in 1973; Susan and her boyfriend, Larry have been enticed to the Brabissant mansion by the Mackeys, a charming, elderly Irish couple who are struck by Susan’s strong resemblance to Veronica, the long-dead daughter of the family for whom they work. Veronica’s room has been untouched by time and has been left exactly as it was in 1935. The mystery deepens as twist after twist unravels the frail threads of reality. Is it 1973 or 1935? Will Susan ever leave Veronica’s room? 

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Permanent Collection

Soon after African-American businessman Sterling North becomes the new director of the Morris Foundation, he discovers that this world-famous art collection includes several significant African sculptures tucked away in storage. His proposal to add them to the public galleries is opposed by the foundation's long-time education director, who is loyal to the idiosyncratic wishes of the late Dr. Morris. Spurred on by a zealous local journalist, this clash quickly escalates to public accusations of racism and a bitter struggle for control of the collection. “Permanent Collection” is a searing examination of racial politics that ultimately asks how much space -- literally and figuratively -- the white world gives to African-Americans. What is the cost of failing to view the world through another's eyes?

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The Trial of the Catonsville Nine

Fifty years ago nine people, including two Catholic priests, entered the Selective Service office in Catonsville, MD and removed 378 draft cards and burned them in the parking lot with homemade napalm to protest the war in Vietnam. Based on the trial transcripts, the play delves into the moral and religious motives of the nine, and why "the burning of paper not children."

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